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Helena Vogue Cover

Danish Supermodel Helena Christensen covers new Vogue Scandinavia

by | Oct 7, 2021

Veteran supermodel Helena Christensen takes over from young climate campaigner Greta Thunberg as covergirl for the second edition of Vogue Scandinavia. The English language magazine is different from other Vogues by being limited edition – mainly online – and the few hard copies available are wrapped in a plastic-free box…and it’s quite expensive at around £16 | $22 plus freight.

The Scandi version of the world’s best-known glossy is interesting – super on-trend with sustainability, equality and much more, but we look forward to seeing more in the second edition out this October of the amazing design talent and creativity that the Nordic countries have produced over the years.

Helena Christensen Coast

Interviews and profiles of leading figures in the five Nordic countries

Helena talks about her hobby and profession as a protographer after quitting the catwalk – her favourite time of day for taking pictures. Most interestingly, for someone whose job it was to look flawless, through the lense she seeks out the imperfect or waits for the little accidents to happen from which great things emerge.

The Copenhagen model was always ahead of the curve and the original boho chic, cool girl. When her fellow supermodels from the late 80s and 90s were moving into luxurious penhouse apartments, Helena furnished her small Paris starter flat with flea market finds.

In this issue she is photographed at her Danish summer house which she bought in the 1990s and where she has holidayed each year with family. She never was the blingy jetsetter spotted on super yachts around the world. Helena’s Scandi cred is certainly real.

Arguably the most famous Scandi fashion model ever, she is the natural covergirl for today’s on-message fashion magazine which focuses on authenticity and issues – her 18th Vogue cover in a modelling career that has so far lasted nearly 30 years.

The Midas Retouch – Influencers daring to be natural

Helena’s interview ties in perfectly with another feature in the thick glossy – as Norway tightens its photo editing law over what they call “kroppspress” or body pressure on social media and more influencers now daring to show how they really look without the re-touching. 

Have we finally had enough of the un-reality presented on Instagram: “Instagram should be a happy place, not this place where you feel miserable when you turn it on,” says Janka Polliani, a Norwegian influencer and journalist in the Vogue Scandi piece The Midas Retouch.

The Midas Retouch - Self image

Vogue Scandianvia is rather big on personal profiles – another feature focuses on awardwinning film producer, actor, singer and director Shima Niavarani in the article Tranformers in Disguise. Who she?, you may ask. The Swedish may also know her as the presenter of their own finals of this year’s Eurovision Song Contest. Here she addresses the challenges of isolation, a topic that has affected every single one of us over the last two years, and the potential of the imagination. It’s a fascinating read by Tom Pattinson.

Shima Niavarani

Noma restaurant named best in the world again – much to write home about

Yet, despite the importance today’s young attach to social and cultural issues – and it’s a welcome change from the 80s and 90s obsession with perfection and materialism, we do still hope for a little more of glitzy products in fashion, accessories, design, film and books as well as food, to be showcased in Vogue Scandinavia.

Noma and Geranium in Copenhagen have just been named best restaurants in the world and film makers, actors, furniture designers, architects and visual artists are among the best.There is plenty of material to fill the pages of even the most bumper of issues. Can’t wait for the magazine to hit the shelf (flagship store only).

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